Kenilworth Castle

The original Kenilworth Castle was a mighty edifice. It sported an enormous Norman tower, a stone rectangle about three floors in height. The castle had a wide moat defending it. The red and sandstone castle is now in its bare shell form, but is almost as imposing a sight, as it was in the days of Henry II. The castle was taken into royal possession by the king, who fell in love with the castle on sight.

The castle had substantial enlargements and alterations made to it by the three successors of Henry II. It was John of Gaunt that effected a transformation of the castle in the 14 th century, from a rustic fortress to a splendid palace. The private apartments located close to the lake was built by him.

Kenilworth Castle

The banqueting hall at the Kenilworth Castle that has a hammer beam roof was at that time almost as important a building as the Westminster Hall then. Other successors such as Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester made considerable refurbishments as well, as did the Crown, when the castle came into its possession after the death of the Earl.

The Kenilworth Castle was immortalized and romanticized by Sir Walter Scott in his novel written in the 19 th century, “Kenilworth”. The castle is one of the best ruins that can be seen in Britain. The powerful Normans deserve such a fitting landmark as the mighty castle, and is also a reminder of how the politics of the Elizabethan times were as comparably gruesome that of our times.

Kenilworth Castle

Important information for visitors . . .

Pricing

Concession – £ 6 . 50
Children – £ 3 . 80
Family Tickets – £ 19 . 00
Adults – £ 7 . 60

Kenilworth Castle

Other Information . . .

Seasonal Dates & Open Hours

Daily 10 a m- 5 p m from 1 s t Apr – 1 s t Nov
Daily 10 a m – 4 p m from 2 n d Nov – 28 t h Feb
Daily 10 a m – 5 p m from 1 s t – 31 s t Mar
Closed during 24 t h – 26 t h Dec and 1 s t Jan

Kenilworth Castle