Schloss Neuschwanstein

Schloss Neuschwanstein is among the most impressive castles in Germany, if not the world. The castle is located at close proximity to the towns of Fussen and Hohenschwangau, at the southwestern portion of Bavaria. The Schloss Neuschwanstein was constructed in the 19 t h century by Ludwig II. King Ludwig I I was an ardent fan of Richard Wagner, the musician. The castle is a major structure in Germany, and is visited by a whole number of travelers and locals alike. The castle is one of the three castles that were built by King Ludwig, and is the most famous.

Neuschwanstein fairy tale castle

Neuschwanstein fairy tale castle

Schloss Neuschwanstein, along with the Schloss Hohenschwangau, is one of the two most notable buildings in the area. Schloss Hohenschwangau was constructed by King Maxmillian II, the father of Ludwig II. The King Ludwig was called the “Mad King Ludwig” as he was rather eccentric and given to many quirks. The King was however widely respected as a benevolent monarch, and built a number of castles and made plans for several others, and these are inclusive of the Linderhof and the Herrenchiemsee. The former was the only castle he lived to see completed.

At the time of building, the Schloss Neuschwanstein was called the New Hohenschwangau Castle. After the death of King Ludwig I I, the castle was renamed the Schloss Neuschwanstein, which meant the “New Swan Stone Castle”. This was a reference to the castle of the Swan Knight Lohengrin in an opera of the same name by Wagner.

Neuschwanstein castle inner courtyard

Neuschwanstein castle inner courtyard

The Shloss Neuschwanstein is actually the most famous of the three castles that were built by King Ludwig. The castle is typically fairy tale, and has been imitated several times. The castle was designed by Christian Jank, who has been described as more of a set designer in drama than an architect. It is said that Eduard Riedel was responsible for the major architectural support, as were Leo Von Klenze and George Dollman.

The King Ludwig II had paid for the castles he had built from his own pocket, and not by looting the state budget. It caused him to be drowned in debt. The government looked askance at the king, and in fact made much opposition against him. In fact, in 1886, they stated Ludwig insane, and placed him under house arrest. The suggestion was made by Professor Bernhard Von Gudden, who was chief among psychiatrists. The statement was made with no proof whatsoever. Ludwig was well loved by his subjects. Laborers and farmers loved him very much, and called him “Unser Kimi”- “our darling king.”